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Pollinator Passion

There HAVE actually been some good things happen in 2020.   One for me was being fortunate to join a small group working to certify Austin as a Bee City through the Xerces Society.  As part of that effort, we've formed Pollinate Austin - PollinATX for short - and, of course, I wanted to share it with you.

We intend to publish a newsletter with articles we're sure you'll find of interest.  We'll link to events and resources within our community as well as simply delight in our favorite "gateway bugs" (yes, they're not true bugs but well, you know.)  If you share our passion, you'll want to be part of the fun.

Subscribe to the newsletter here: 
https://forms.gle/VcYiKxqmi618PjBSA

And follow us on Facebook here:  https://www.facebook.com/PollinATX    

Looking forward to seeing you!



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